Lombardian Recipes

Lombardian Cuisine

History gastronomy

The northern region of Lombardy snuggles up against the Swiss border, from which alpine mountains give way to the flatter lands of the Po Valley. The region owes its name to the Lombards, a Germanic people who reigned over the area for two centuries, from the 570s to 770s.

Given Lombardy’s diverse cultural influences (largely due to its proximity to the rest of Europe) and diverse terrain, expect nothing less of its cuisine. Not surprisingly, the gastronomy is a blend of quintessential Italian flavors and those of its northern, European neighbors, lending, for example, to a preference for butter over the usually ubiquitous olive oil.

Speaking of butter, there’s a thriving cattle industry in these parts and therefore an equally robust dairy industry. As such, butter, cream, and cheese are all a very big deal, producing popular, world-known formaggi such as the sweetly flavored Valtellina Casera, and the Parmesan-like Grana Padano.

 

Beef is important, too, sharing the spotlight with other meats that range from pork to veal, chicken, turkey and more. Lombard proteins shine in treasured regional recipes such as ossobuco, a Milanese dish of veal shank and vegetables, and cotoletta, a fried, bone-in veal cutlet. Then there’s bollito misto, a stew of boiled meats and veggies, which pairs perfectly with the local sweet-tangy-and-spiced, fruit-based condiment mostarda.

Other dishes here are often just as hearty, such as saffron-tinged risotto alla milanese, and cheese- and butter-dressed polenta. Pasta has its place in Lombard hearts, too, particularly the buckwheat-based specialty of Valtellina, pizzoccheri.

All these filling dishes also call for some wine, of course, often from local Lombard regions such as Franciacorta and Oltrepò Pavese. Both areas specialize in sparkling wines, though also offer up reds and whites.

And let’s not forget those sweets, a source of great Lombard pride. Two of the region’s treats have attained particularly notable global fame, including the almond-flavored amaretti cookies, and the Christmas favorite panettone, a sweet bread cake laced with raisins and candied fruit.

Lombardian Cuisine

History gastronomy

The northern region of Lombardy snuggles up against the Swiss border, from which alpine mountains give way to the flatter lands of the Po Valley. The region owes its name to the Lombards, a Germanic people who reigned over the area for two centuries, from the 570s to 770s.

Given Lombardy’s diverse cultural influences (largely due to its proximity to the rest of Europe) and diverse terrain, expect nothing less of its cuisine. Not surprisingly, the gastronomy is a blend of quintessential Italian flavors and those of its northern, European neighbors, lending, for example, to a preference for butter over the usually ubiquitous olive oil.

Speaking of butter, there’s a thriving cattle industry in these parts and therefore an equally robust dairy industry. As such, butter, cream, and cheese are all a very big deal, producing popular, world-known formaggi such as the sweetly flavored Valtellina Casera, and the Parmesan-like Grana Padano.

 

Beef is important, too, sharing the spotlight with other meats that range from pork to veal, chicken, turkey and more. Lombard proteins shine in treasured regional recipes such as ossobuco, a Milanese dish of veal shank and vegetables, and cotoletta, a fried, bone-in veal cutlet. Then there’s bollito misto, a stew of boiled meats and veggies, which pairs perfectly with the local sweet-tangy-and-spiced, fruit-based condiment mostarda.

Other dishes here are often just as hearty, such as saffron-tinged risotto alla milanese, and cheese- and butter-dressed polenta. Pasta has its place in Lombard hearts, too, particularly the buckwheat-based specialty of Valtellina, pizzoccheri.

All these filling dishes also call for some wine, of course, often from local Lombard regions such as Franciacorta and Oltrepò Pavese. Both areas specialize in sparkling wines, though also offer up reds and whites.

And let’s not forget those sweets, a source of great Lombard pride. Two of the region’s treats have attained particularly notable global fame, including the almond-flavored amaretti cookies, and the Christmas favorite panettone, a sweet bread cake laced with raisins and candied fruit.

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